Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Off Grid EV Project: Understanding Quick Chargers (DCFC) - Nissan bringing 100 Stations to US | Nissan/ETECH bLABS/blink

With the onset of many Americans coming to a realization that the #EV movement/#rEVolution is REAL, We have BREAKING NEWS:
It's True.

Many different types of Drivers are learning the advantages of Electric Vehicles.

Tesla Motors and Nissan have unveiled Dynamic additions to their charging networks:
>>Tesla is to offer free #OffGrid type solar charging stations free to use for Tesla Owners. Also recently unveiled Battery Swap Stations...

>>Nissan recently announced plans for 100 Quick Charging/DCFC Stations at Nissan Dealerships.
There is a real surge in ownership of EV's.
I am one of them (Proud owner of Nissan LEAF SL).  My #EV has the Quick Charger port built in next to the 6.6 kWh Charging port.
We Madison LEAF owners are very excited to hear about the addition of #DCFC Chargers in our area (Madison, Milwaukee). http://www.facebook.com/groups/MadisonLeafers/

As a member of the blink Charging Network, I am looking forward to their upgrades as well.

We came across this article from ETECH Labs on LinkedIn and thought it explains the DCFC Charging Upgrades.

Check out our EV/OffGrid Living Page:
http://madtownpreppers.blogspot.com/p/off-grid-living.html
  • Nissan To Add Electric Vehicle Quick Charging At More Than 100 U.S. LEAF-Certified Dealerships - engadget Quick charge units can recharge Nissan LEAF to 80 percent in about 30 minutes.
    So far, the active chargers in the program have been popular. Since the pilot began, about 5,600 charging sessions have taken place, with each location averaging about 4.5 sessions per day. That figure has been steadily on the rise as awareness has increased. Over the period of June 21-July 1, the number of charging sessions increased about 12.5 percent compared to the previous two-week period.
    Installation of new chargers will begin in east coast markets, starting this summer. By April 1, 2014, Nissan expects to have quick chargers installed and operational at 100 additional dealerships.
    Nissan's charging partner AeroVironment will supply the quick chargers and will provide installation services for nearly all of the new quick charging units.

Jeff Wishart
By Blog

July 8, 2013

Understanding DC Fast Charging

It’s believed that electric vehicles (EVs) sales will take off when there is a large, reliable, publically accessible charging infrastructure. At this point, most of this infrastructure is at the AC Level 2 power rating (up to 19.2 kW, although almost all current electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) units – including the Blink® AC Level 2 EVSE units from ETEC LABS’ parent company ECOtality – go up to 7.2 kW). This means that most of the EVSE units on the street are great if you have a few hours to spend in order to get a significant charge back in your battery. But, we see that for battery-only vehicles, like the Nissan LEAF, demand for charging stations that can provide a lot of range in a short amount of time is growing.
Fortunately, DC Level 2 (up to 90 kW), often referred to as DC Fast Chargers (DCFCs) or Quick Chargers (QCs, although these are usually only up to 25 kW) do just that. A DCFC can give an EV owner the confidence to expand their driving range and can help alleviate range anxiety. The exact level of maximum charging power varies depending on manufacturer. In case you’re wondering, Blink DCFCs can provide up to 60 kW of charging power, allowing a vehicle to quickly receive a significant amount of charge and get back on the road. Incidentally, the Blink DCFC network is the largest in the world.
Range anxiety is when an EV driver is unsure if they will make it to their destination before their electric vehicle battery is out of charge.
Have you wondered why the charging sessions may be different each time you use a DCFC? Regardless of whether the DCFC is compliant with either the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1772 standard or the Japanese CHAdeMO standard, the vehicle, not the DCFC, dictates the charge rate as well as the start and finish of the charging session. The DCFC merely “tells” the car what rate of electricity transfer it can provide, and it’s up to the vehicle control system to “decide” how much to take and for how long. Most vehicles will start a charging session by accepting as high a charging rate as its on-board electronics and battery will allow, before tapering off as the battery gets charged and especially if the battery starts to heat up.

Understanding “State of Charge” Is Key

To fully understand DCFC charging, let’s look at the concept of “state of charge” (SOC) and how it affects your charging session. The SOC is a measure of how “full” the battery is as a percentage, with 0% being completely empty of charge (something your vehicle will never allow to happen since it would cause great damage to your battery) and 100% being completely full (again, doesn’t usually happen in practice). SOC is a notoriously difficult quantity to measure or predict (for reasons that are too involved to go into in a blog post!), not to mention, vehicle manufacturers consider their methods of calculation proprietary.
In the CHAdeMO standard (to which Blink DCFCs and most other manufacturers in the U.S. currently adhere), the vehicle provides battery capacity messages, and the DCFC uses these messages in a calculation to get an estimate of SOC. But the vehicle may calculate SOC differently than the DCFC, which is why the display on the dash might depart significantly from the DCFC display!
For the SAE standard, the vehicle simply provides an SOC value; however, again this value is not necessarily the value that the vehicle will display on the dash. In either case, the DCFC has no control over the information that is passed and the accuracy of its SOC display is at the mercy of the whims of the vehicle manufacturer. For example, the CHAdeMO standard dictates that the battery capacity messages should not change throughout the charge session, but the vehicle manufacturer can change said capacity messages during the session as much as it likes. The battery capacity messages sent by the vehicle can also be different than what the actual value is, skewing the accuracy of the DCFC-displayed SOC from the start, and making it more like a broad estimate than an actual representation.

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So remember to take the DCFC SOC display with more than a few grains of salt!
The Blink DCFC allows the user to specify the target SOC for the charging session. The higher the target SOC, the longer the charge will take. So far, so good. But some vehicles make it more complicated by ending a charging session before the target SOC is reached. This is based on several factors that won’t be apparent to you as you’re waiting for the session to end, such as an elevated battery temperature, an internal vehicle fault, or a charge imbalance in the battery cells. Some vehicles will end the charging session early to protect the battery from overcharging.

Why Original SOC Matters

The charging session can also be affected by the beginning SOC of the vehicle. When the starting SOC is below 50% in the Nissan Leaf and below 70% SOC in the Mitsubishi i-MiEV, the vehicle will stop the charge at around 80% SOC even if the target SOC selected is higher. The i-MiEV will also terminate a charging session if an EV driver shifts the vehicle from Park to Neutral (this is impossible to do in the Leaf).
A charging session ending unexpectedly might surprise and frustrate drivers who wanted a full charge. Unfortunately, Blink has no control over the vehicle decision on charge rate or charge session end point. Moreover, even if we knew what a particular vehicle does today, the vehicle manufacturer may change it at any point and not tell us. Other EVSE manufacturers face the same challenges.

What You Can Do to Get the Most from a DCFC Session

On the vehicle owner side, you can familiarize yourself with your vehicle’s quirks, so that there aren’t any surprises. You can also plan ahead so that the ending SOC will be enough to get to your destination, e.g., by judiciously choosing a DCFC that is located well within the vehicle range of the destination.

What Blink Is Doing for You

On the Blink side, we are in the process of changing the user interface on our DCFC touchscreens to better reflect the DCFC charging possibilities of when the session will end. We are also investigating having an automatic re-start for users that have chosen a target SOC but don’t receive it in their first charging session.
It’s important to note, however, that the purpose of a DCFC is really not to go to a full charge (some owners, like those with a Nissan Leaf, are encouraged by the auto manufacturer not to charge above 80% to prolong battery life). A DCFC is intended as a quick top-up charge to bridge the gap in vehicle range to get the vehicle to the destination where a full charge at a lower power level (i.e., AC Level 2) can be obtained. You may not even want to charge above 80% since the vehicle control system often throttles the charge rate so that going from 80% to 100% may take just as long as it took to go from 30% to 80%. If you are charging your EV at a Blink DCFC and there is another EV owner plugged in and waiting for a charge, his/her charge session will start automatically and immediately after your session ends. If you really want to get that top up charge, just swipe your Blink card and set up another charge session that likewise will start immediately after your counterpart EV owner’s session ends.


 https://www.blinknetwork.com/chargers-commercial-dc-fast.html

Help us spread the word in the EV community on how DCFCs work and share this with your friends. We’d also like to hear how you use DCFCs in your travels. Share your experiences in the comments.
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Nissan to install EV quick charge stations at more than 100 US dealerships


Nissan to install over 100 EV quick charge stations at US dealerships
Like Tesla, Nissan knows that EV drivers want a safety net of charging stations; it's no fun to hunt for a power socket many miles from home. Accordingly, the automaker will soon deploy CHAdeMO-based quick chargers at more than 100 dealerships across 21 US markets. The rollout starts this summer and finishes by April 1st of next year. Combined with stations from a 24-dealer pilot, the expansion should give many urban Leaf drivers at least one reliable charging location -- and Nissan may get a few more sales in the bargain.

Nissan To Add Electric Vehicle Quick Charging At More Than 100 U.S. LEAF-Certified Dealerships
Quick charge units can recharge Nissan LEAF to 80 percent in about 30 minutes
NASHVILLE, Tenn., July 8, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- In an effort to speed the expansion of electric vehicle charging and build consumer awareness of the capability of the all-electric Nissan LEAF, Nissan will support installation of more than 100 DC quick chargers at LEAF-certified dealers in 21 key markets nationwide.
The units, which use the CHAdeMO standard, can charge the vehicle from depleted to about 80 percent in about 30 minutes.
Brendan Jones, director of Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Strategy, Nissan said: "Nissan is undertaking a proactive, multi-pronged approach to expand charging infrastructure to enhance awareness of electric cars like the LEAF and instill range confidence in potential customers. We know that available charging infrastructure opens the doors for more Nissan LEAF sales."
This quick charging initiative follows a 24-dealer pilot program, which Nissan rolled out at dealerships in the markets of San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, Sacramento and Seattle. During the pilot, Nissan has been able to study the frequency of use for the chargers and the impact that charging has on the dealer's operations.
"We are located at the intersection of two of the country's busiest freeways, so having a quick charger available for the thousands of commuters who drive by us every day is a boon for business," said Richard Luengo, general manager, Nissan of Downtown Los Angeles, which is averaging about 10 charging sessions per day at its quick charger. "There is a steady stream of folks using the charger, and we've generated significant good will in the LEAF community. Over the past four months, our dealership has seen a marked improvement in sales, and some of that is clearly attributable to the new quick charger."
So far, the active chargers in the program have been popular. Since the pilot began, about 5,600 charging sessions have taken place, with each location averaging about 4.5 sessions per day. That figure has been steadily on the rise as awareness has increased. Over the period of June 21-July 1, the number of charging sessions increased about 12.5 percent compared to the previous two-week period.
Installation of new chargers will begin in east coast markets, starting this summer. By April 1, 2014, Nissan expects to have quick chargers installed and operational at 100 additional dealerships.
Nissan's charging partner AeroVironment will supply the quick chargers and will provide installation services for nearly all of the new quick charging units.





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